Guy Porter Gillette was drafted into the Vietnam War in 1967 but didn't report for duty. When he was contacted, he said that he was a Conscientious Objector. His case was taken to the Supreme Court in 1969. He claimed that he would fight in wars of National Defense or United Nations Peace Keeping wars, but believed that the Vietnam war was immoral and unjust. Judge Burger was the chief justice at the time. The court decided against Gillette, saying that to be conscientious objector you have to be against violence and killing in general, not just against a specific war. Thurgood Marshall wrote the majority opinion, agreeing with the court and saying that you have refuse to "participate war in any form." This Supreme Court decision affected many during the Vietnam war as many people protested the war and believed it was unjust. The case said that those people would still have to participate in the draft. Although Gillette was not a C.O in the end, this case affected many and changed what it meant to be a CO.
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On the left is Chief Justice Burger and on the right is Thurgood Marshall.


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